Notes on wolves; part III

Wolfing

Wolf hierarchy is very prominent when they eat; older wolves growl and even slightly attack younglings to teach them to wait; until others have their part of meal. Basically; the higher you stand; the wider choice of meal you have. If one wolf finds something edible; it might chase off the others and try to enjoy the meal alone.

When I look at how young pups play I see them use their snouts actively in games; grabbing and carefully biting each other; often one of the wolves will try to get on top with his snout; front paws or even whole body. The other wolf might not like it and then the chase commences.

Seems like wolves do know their territory really well. The time they spend not hunting or resting they examine it; and I guess; they know every tree and every bush nearby the den site or even in their whole area. Always curious; they look at the changes.

Final curious thing I learned today is that wolves are really good about digging; they actually dig whole tunnels if needed; although the exact reason is not clear to me yet; just the fact that they can dig one.

Notes on wolves; part II

Wolfing

It is interesting to watch wolves express domination on the other members of pack. Sometimes they even use forepaws to push the lower rank member down! Still; all those interactions are meant to be rather careful; with all the biting and pouncing; the lower ranking member might respond with force if getting uncomfortable. Still; lower rank is lower; even if you deal with younger members of pack; the tail of submissive wolf is pressed down to his legs or is hidden between them.

The sound of a pack howling is magnificent; all those tones changing and interweaving; getting quiet and catching up again! The leader of the pack has the important role in that howl.

Curious how younger pups grow up just having fun and playing games; but very soon they are introduced to the social ranking of the pack and their behaviour starts to shift as appropriate to follow their place; that they will fight for too keep.

Notes on wolves; part I

Wolfing

I want to start writing short notes on the life of wolves as I read about them and watch them. I don’t have a chance to spend lots of time next to real wolves yet; so the only information source I can rely on is internet; thus my opinions will be surely flawed. That said; I will try to make my notes reasonable and useful not only for me.

It’s curious to see how young wolves play. They tend to grab each other by the snout fur; occasionally holding the whole opponent’s snout in their jaws; but mostly going for the fur at sides of the head; sometimes ears. The don’t bite hard; as tugging on ears would be really painful. Other prominent targets are the scruff and sides; sometimes hind legs and tail.

Wolves do dig holes in the ground when the weather is hot; not unlike dogs. They usually go two swipes with each of the front paws; changing them as they dig.

Curious wolves usually focus on the object that inspired their curiosity; moving very little; standing or sitting; all focused on their target. They rarely twitch ears when at that and overall are rather immobile.